© 2014 by Growers Outlet

Some of Our Favorite Fruit Trees and Vines!

These are some of our favorite fruit trees that should produce fruit in our area based on their rated chill hours. It is important to buy your fruit trees from a local supplier, as chill hours are very important. The large box stores tend to stock some varieties that will not produce in our area.

In Montgomery County the average chill hours are around 400 hours. What are chill hours? Chill hours are the number of hours that the temperature is between 32 and 45 degrees Fahrenheit. To produce fruit, it is necessary that the tree be exposed to a minimum number of chill hours to complete a dormancy period in order to set fruits the following spring.

 

We start selling our fruit trees bare root in January or February, and will have some varieties potted. Citrus, grapes, berries and persimmons are only sold as containerized plants at this time. Bare root fruit trees must be planted as early as possible. Come by and check out the varieties available in the spring and fall.

 

 

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How to Grow Peaches

 

Varieties we carry (Chill Hours): No Pollinators Needed

 

 FlordaKing (450) - Cling

Elberta (850) – Freestone

June Gold (600-650)- Semi Cling

LaFeliciana (550-600)- Freestone

Redskin (750)- Freestone

Sam Houston (500)- Freestone

 

 

Soil Preparation:

In the late winter/early spring start to amend the soil with organic compost to help add nutrients back to the soil. Dig hole no larger than the root ball, but leave about 2 inches of the root ball above the ground. Ground should be soft enough to dig and sturdy enough to hold the tree in place. Peaches can be grown in a wide range of soil types. The ideal, however, is a well-drained, sandy loam at least 18 to 24 inches above red, well-drained clay subsoil. Spacing is approximately 100 trees per acre.

 

Sunlight and Watering:

Place in full sun for more flowers and better production, area should be moist when planted. Do not water again until they start leafing out. Allowed soil to dry before watering again. Soggy soils and fruit trees don’t do good together.

 

Fertilization:

Use Microlife 6-2-4 Citrus and Fruit, Microlife 6-2-4 Multipurpose as an organic fertilizer or Nelson’s 12-10-10 Citrus and Avocado food for synthetic fertilization. Follow proper feeding schedules.

 

Spraying:

A proper spray schedule is essential to good home peach production. Refer to our Fruit Tree Prune and Spray links on our website.

 

Pollination:

Peaches are self-pollinators

 

Pruning:

Before planting bare root fruit trees, be sure to prune them back approximately one-third. This helps compensate for root loss, is necessary for healthy production, and helps the tree form stronger limbs. Refer to our Fruit Tree Prune and Spray links on our website.

 

 

How to Grow Pears

                                       

Varieties we carry (Chill Hours): Need Pollinators

 

Moonglow (500) – Similar to the Bartlett pear with good resistance to fire blight.

Pineapple (150)-Large Golden with sweet tart taste

Warren (600-800)-Medium to large sweet pear

Monterrey (100-200)-Large apple shaped pear

Keiffer (300-400)-Large green/yellow blushed red. Best pollinator for others.

 

Soil Preparation:

In the late winter/early spring start to amend the soil with organic compost to help add nutrients back to the soil. Dig hole no larger than the root ball, but leave about 2 inches of the root ball above the ground. Ground should be soft enough to dig and sturdy enough to hold the tree in place.

 

Sunlight and Watering:

Place in full sun for more flowers and better production, area should be moist and no supplemental watering will be needed until they start leafing out. After that, allow soil to dry before watering again. Soggy soils and fruit trees don’t go well together.

 

Fertilization:

Use Microlife 6-2-4 Citrus and Fruit, Microlife 6-2-4 Multipurpose as an organic fertilizer or Nelson’s 12-10-10 Citrus and Avocado food for synthetic fertilization. Follow proper feeding schedules.

 

Spraying: A proper spray schedule is detrimental to good home pear production. Refer to our Fruit Tree Prune and Spray links on our website.

 

Common Insects and Diseases:

Fire Blight (Disease) – blossoms appear water-soaked and gray-green but quickly turn brown or black. Usually appears a week after petals have fallen off; young shoots and stems turn black or brown and bend over into a hook shape resembling a shepherd’s hook or candy cane. When weather is warm and humid small droplets of sticky ooze can be seen on the surface of blighted shoots. If blight reaches older supporting wood, dark sunken cankers form.

 

Pollination:

Pears must pollinators. Use the “Keiffer” pear with any other variety.

 

Pruning:

Before planting bare root fruit trees, be sure to prune them back approximately one-third. This helps compensate for root loss, is necessary for healthy production, and helps the tree form stronger limbs. Refer to our Fruit Tree Prune and Spray links on our website.

 

 

 How to Grow Apples

 

Varieties we carry (Chill Hours): Need pollinators for best production

 

Pink Lady  (450) SP – Oblong, yellow when ripe with pink blush. Ripens in October.

Anna  (400) SP– Large, light greenish color with slight red blush. Ripens in June.

Dorsett  (250) – Medium-sized, yellow skin with orange blush. Ripens in July. 

Gala (600) SP-Medium sized, gold skin w/red striping. Ripens 140-160 days after bloom.

Ein Shemer (350) SP-Large, green/yellow crisp tart flavor

Plant Anna with Dorsett for best pollination.

 

Soil Preparation:

In the late winter/early spring start to amend the soil with organic compost to help add nutrients back to the soil. Dig hole no larger than the root ball, but leave about 2 inches of the root ball above the ground. Ground should be soft enough to dig and sturdy enough to hold the tree in place.

 

Sunlight and Watering:

Place in full sun for more flowers and better production, area should be moist and no supplemental watering will be needed until they start leafing out. After that, allow soil to dry before watering again. Soggy soils and fruit trees don’t go well together.

 

Fertilization:      

Use Microlife 6-2-4 Citrus and Fruit, Microlife 6-2-4 Multipurpose as an organic fertilizer or Nelson’s 12-10-10 Citrus and Avocado food for synthetic fertilization. Follow proper feeding schedules.

 

Spraying: A proper spray schedule is essential to good home apple production. Refer to our Fruit Tree Prune and Spray links on our website.

 

Pollination:

Pink Lady, Anna, and Golden Dorsett apples are all able to cross-pollinate one another.

 

Pruning:

Before planting bare root fruit trees, be sure to prune them back approximately one-third. This helps compensate for root loss, is necessary for healthy production, and helps the tree form stronger limbs. Refer to our Fruit Tree Prune and Spray links on our website.

 

How to Grow Plums

 

Varieties we carry (Chill Hours): No Pollinators Needed

 

Santa Rosa  (400) – Japanese plum, bears small reddish-purple fruits

Methley  (250) – Japanese plum, bears large rosy-red fruits

Morris (400)- Japanese plum, Red skin with yellow flesh

Au Rubrum (650)- Medium sized maroon plum with with red flesh

 

Soil Preparation:

In the late winter/early spring start to amend the soil with organic compost to help add nutrients back to the soil. Dig hole no larger than the root ball, but leave about 2 inches of the root ball above the ground. Ground should be soft enough to dig and sturdy enough to hold the tree in place.

                                                  

Sunlight and Watering:

Place in full sun for more flowers and better production, area should be moist when planted. Do not water again until they start leafing out. Allowed soil to dry before watering again. Soggy soils and fruit trees don’t do good together.

 

Fertilization:

Use Microlife 6-2-4 Citrus and Fruit, Microlife 6-2-4 Multipurpose as an organic fertilizer or Nelson’s 12-10-10 Citrus and Avocado food for synthetic fertilization. Follow proper feeding schedules.

 

Spraying:

A proper spray schedule is essential to good home plum production. Refer to our Fruit Tree Prune and Spray links on our website.

 

Pollination:

Plums are self pollinating but will produce better with two or more varieties

 

Pruning:

Before planting bare root fruit trees, be sure to prune them back approximately one-third. This helps compensate for root loss, is necessary for healthy production, and helps the tree form stronger limbs. Refer to our Fruit Tree Prune and Spray links on our website.